Geology

Geology

Figure 12. The Pandora vein system on the Oklila exploration permit

Figure 12. The Pandora vein system on the Oklila exploration permit

The Pandora vein is a prominent northwest-southeast striking vein that occurs in a fault zone up to 10m wide. The vein itself attains average widths in excess of 2m (up to 10m) and is continuous for approximately 2.6km but visible alteration can be traced for over 6km along the structure. The structure is parallel to the regional northwest trend linked to the rift movement. The vein dips steeply to the northeast and splays within the vein structure suggest a dextral component of movement on the fault.

In addition to the Pandora vein itself, several other veins within the Oklila permit were identified. The grade and width of these occurrences is generally less than the Pandora segment of the controlling structure. The major NW graben structure that hosts the Pandora vein is partially covered by basalt talus from the horst on its NE side.

The veins are hosted in a series of basalt flows and volcaniclastics parts of the Stratoïd Series, basalts consisting of thick flows of 1.8-2.7Ma in age. The dip of the flows and sediments hosting the vein is very gentle, almost flat. The vein outcrops were previously mapped in historical references as rhyolite during regional photo-geological mapping. Lacustrine sediments are interbedded with the older basalt flows. Three active fumaroles are known along the structure hosting the vein.

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